16 Useful Tips for Traveling Distant Alone As A Woman

tips for traveling alone as a woman
(Last Updated On: August 18, 2021)

Traveling is charming. Everyone should travel for many reasons. Tips for traveling alone as a woman make the trip safe, secured, and memorable. In this article, I am going to give 16 tips for traveling alone as a woman.

When you truly want to travel alone, there’s no reason not to, so pull on your big-girl pants and utilize these suggestions as a first-time solo traveler.

Tips for traveling alone as a woman

Here are tips for traveling alone as a woman:

1.Don’t overpack.

You don’t want to be the chick dragging luggage half your size or a bag you can’t handle for more than a few hundred meters up and down cobblestone streets. Whatever the length of your vacation, your luggage should be of a size and weight that you can easily carry up and down a few flights of stairs.

Packing light doesn’t have to mean looking like a hobo; you may still wear adorable, pretty, sophisticated, athletic, or whatever another style you want, but balance is essential.

You just need enough clothing for five days for a lengthy vacation, after which you may wash and repeat. Bring a variety of clothing and shoes that you can mix and match and wear in several ways for activities, excursions, city breaks, and nightlife. Consider if you really need those heels. Wouldn’t beautiful flats work just as well (and be more comfortable)?

Instead of folding your clothing, roll them and use packing cubes to arrange and conserve space. Don’t bring a lot of amenities with you; shampoo, conditioner, and soap are all readily accessible, and it’s simply not worth it to add to your luggage.

2. Take into account hostels and guesthouses.

If you’re worried about being lonely and sad while on your first solo trip overseas, try staying in locations where meeting people is simpler. Hostels are a great alternative to traditional hotels. (that include private single rooms if dormitories aren’t your thing), guesthouses, and social hotels that encourage visitors to socialize in common areas and during social activities.

Free group walking tours, parties, cookouts, barbeques, and other enjoyable events are also held at these locations, making it easier to meet new people. Don’t worry, there are lots of single travelers that come from all over the world.

3. Purchase travel insurance.

Whether you’re an experienced traveler or a first-time backpacker, be sure you’re covered in case something goes wrong. As we saw during the COVID-19 epidemic, unexpected catastrophes might strike at any time.

Due to an unexpected loss in the family, I’ve had a buddy break bones and need to be helicoptered out of the Amazon or fly back.

You never know what will occur. There’s a lot of uncertainty on the way. Make certain you’re safe. It will also provide you with peace of mind and enable you to travel confidently.

4. Experiment with new ideas

You could think of yourself at home as someone who avoids doing new things since you’re typically poor at them or can’t envision performing them. I can identify since I used to be that person—even now when I have to attempt anything new, I go in with zero expectations because that’s how awful I think I am at new things. But that doesn’t stop me from trying any longer.

The thing about travel, especially solo travel, is that it gives you the opportunity to rewrite your story from the current moment; you can be more than who you thought you were and do more than you ever dreamed. Say yes more often and embrace the opportunity to experience new activities and adventures, meet locals and other visitors, and trust that you’ll fit right in new circumstances.

5. Get Rid of the Checklist and the Fear of Missing Out

On your first solo vacation overseas, you may feel obligated to do everything there is to do, see everything there is to see, try everything there is to try, and experience all there is in a new place—everything you read about in a guidebook or on the internet.

But here’s what happens when you attempt to jam too much into a short amount of time: you become stressed out, planning, arranging, and rushing from one site to the next without truly appreciating the experience of exploring on your own.

The best part of visiting a charming medieval Italian town is having a free afternoon to wander around cobblestone streets and take in the historic architecture, then sitting in a quiet alley or lakeside, licking on swirls of gelato and people watching- rather than hopping from museum to museum on some crazy mission.

Those unforeseen encounters provided fodder for interesting talks with locals and interesting stories to tell.

Get rid of FOMO (Fear Of Missing Out). Allow yourself to go to a park and read a book beneath the shade of a tree if you wake up on one of your trip days and feel like that’s all you want to do.

6. Get to Know the Locals

Do you know how they say that travelers aren’t the same as tourists? While it may appear to be pretentious nonsense at times, it turns out that there are certain distinctions between those who travel with no awareness or attention and those who do so with a goal to learn about other people and cultures.

Sure, you could travel to a beach town, lounge on the beach all day, and think that your encounters with the cocktail waiters are adequate cultural immersion. But you already know that isn’t the case.

Traveling alone, especially as a woman, has the advantage of making it simpler to chat to other people, even if it means pushing yourself out of your comfort zone to do so because everyone needs companionship at some point. Take advantage of the opportunity to meet locals and inquire about their culture, art, architecture, food, and anything else that piques your curiosity.

While you may always meet people the old-fashioned way by smiling and talking to bartenders, waiters, and people at parties or community activities, the internet, and social media have made it much easier to interact with locals online before you arrive or while you’re in their city.

There are apps and services that allow you to enjoy a home-cooked dinner with a local, go on a tour of their city with a local, sleep in a local’s spare room or apartment, or meet up with a group of locals and tourists who have same interests. Determine your level of comfort, use caution, and place your confidence in others.

If you go on a tour, look for one that is socially responsible and includes true cultural immersion—meeting and talking with locals rather than just getting a surface-level picture of life in that location.

7. Let go of your preconceived notions

Unfortunately, many individuals who appear to be well-traveled come home with views that are entirely unchanged from when they first went because they never manage to fully let go of their preconceptions. Don’t be that person, and don’t have biases based on color, gender, nationality, or socioeconomic status.

Use your first solo travel as an opportunity to approach events with an open mind, even if it means meeting individuals from different origins and cultures. Be aware of and attentive to cultural differences. Avoid the temptation to start your contacts and discussions with clichés; it may be annoying and insulting in ways you may not realize.

8. Stay Aware, Alert, and Safe

When it comes to your safety, it goes without saying that you must be attentive, alert, and cautious. While I believe in spontaneity, if this is your first time traveling alone, a little study to establish your bearings in a new place may go a long way.

Booking accommodations in a secure, central, and well-connected to public transit location, avoiding neighborhoods notorious for high crime rates, and not engaging with people when your instinct tells you not to are all basic safety precautions to take. Never put your safety in jeopardy by staying in a cheap hotel on the outskirts of town or in isolated districts.

Keep a local phone number handy, as well as emergency numbers, and keep your family and lodging informed of your movements. Don’t tell someone you just met about where you’ll be staying or that you’ll be alone.

At a bar, always order your own drinks, and if you’ve left your drink unattended for even a few minutes, leave it and order another.

Dressing correctly and avoiding flaunting valuables in high-traffic locations are no-brainers.

Take more attention inside the hotel room, or in the toilets. Try not to be nude and take care of your sensitive organs of the body inside washrooms, or hotels in order to keep yourself safe from any hidden camera (if any).

9. Get to Know the Traveling Community

People on the road, whether you meet them in hostels, social hotels, guesthouses, or on group excursions, have one thing in common with you: they love to travel. In most situations, all it takes is a smile and an introduction, and the discussion will naturally develop from there.

Typically, you’d wind up chatting about the city you’re in and what each of you has done there so far, where you’re going and what you’re intending to do next, your hometowns, or upcoming major athletic or popular events like FIFA or Eurovision.

While some of these individuals may become lifelong friends, some may only be good company for a single chat, dinner, or a few days—people you won’t keep in contact with and will most likely never encounter again, which is fine. Enjoy the now without worrying about what could or might not happen in the future.

10. Put your camera down

You want to take those Instagram-inspired model-like photographs of yourself in picture-perfect locations, or you’re a photographer who can’t get enough photos of Iceland’s waterfalls.

But keep in mind that life is infinitely more lovely and colorful through your eyes than it could ever be through a smartphone or camera lens. Place your camera down and pay attention; watch, breathe, smell, hear, taste, and speak with new cities and towns rather than shooting them.

11. Wear Clothes That Blend In

While perspectives differ on this, I feel that clothing to blend in has more benefits for women traveling alone than the apparent one of not attracting unwelcome attention. It’s strangely pleasant to dress in a way that makes me feel at ease and at home in a new location, and it makes it simpler to strike up a conversation with locals.

When visiting new places, it is common to study how people dress and strive to dress in a similar manner, particularly when it comes to modesty and recognizing what is and is not suitable.

Avoiding unwanted male attention or being a target for touts and fraudsters by not standing out as a tourist because of how you’re dressed also helps to alleviate the anxiety that comes with traveling alone as a woman.

12. Adapt to the Situation

You will become anxious if every day is planned out and there are timelines to adhere to. Very agitated. If there are any hiccups in your well-planned schedule, you’ll be rushed and dissatisfied.

There will also be hiccups. And there are hiccups. And a slew of other small and significant annoyances. Life on the road is both exciting and difficult since things don’t always go as planned.

When you prepare too much, you leave little space for the unexpected joys of travel. There’s no room for making a spur-of-the-moment decision or adopting fresh facts and suggestions.

Make sure your strategy is adaptable when creating it. It’s important to learn to go with the flow. Plan one or two activities and then relax for the remainder of the day.

It will be a more pleasurable and stress-free experience. What occurs will surprise you.

Be adaptable. Allow life to unfold as it should.

13. Bring some extra cash

Although travel is not as expensive as many people believe, you must still set aside funds to fulfill your necessities. Smart money management is the key to long-term travel.

Always, however, overestimate the amount you’ll require. On the road, you never know what could happen. After all, you didn’t save every cent and remain at home to miss out on those once-in-a-lifetime experiences, did you?

14. Keep in mind that everyone is in the same boat.

When you’re new to travel, it takes guts to approach people, especially if you’re an introvert like myself. So, what are your thoughts? Is it possible for you to just invite folks to join you? What if you wind up on your own?

We’re all in the same boat. There are other single travelers searching for companionship all around you. They, too, desire to meet new individuals.

While there are a few tips to assist you to meet people, it all boils down to saying “hello” and taking the first step. After that, everything else will fall into place. There’s nothing to lose.

It will assist you in overcoming your shyness, making new acquaintances, and improving your conversation skills.

15. Take a chance.

We can only progress when we step outside of our comfort zones. And travel is all about development. That doesn’t mean you have to do something hazardous, but it does mean you have to push yourself beyond your comfort zone.

Hiking, skydiving, trying new foods, camping, rock climbing, and hitchhiking are all perfectly acceptable ways to take a risk. Everyone’s interests and tolerance levels are different. Yours should be pushed. It may be frightening and unsettling at first, but you’ll be pleased you did it later.

Put yourself to the test. Experiment with fresh ideas. You’ll feel more self-assured when you leave.

16. Keep in mind that you are not alone.

Wherever you go, you’ll find a network of fellow travelers who will become your friends, provide you advice or suggestions, and assist you. They will mentor you, advise you, and put you in the correct way.

Everything will turn out OK. You’ll make a lot of friends and have a lot of fun. When you travel alone, you are never truly alone. Have faith in me. For the past fifteen years, I’ve been hiking alone and have never felt lonely.

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16 Useful Tips for Traveling Distant Alone As A Woman

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